Bhairavi

Jai Ma Bhairavi

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Bhairavi is also identified with Kalaratri, a name often associated with Kali that means “black night (of destruction)” and refers to a particularly destructive aspect of Kali. She is also identified with Mahapralaya, the great dissolution at the end of a cosmic cycle, during which all things, having been consumed with fire, are dissolved in the formless waters of procreation. She is the force that tends toward dissolution. This force, furthermore, which is actually Bhairavi herself, is present in each person as one gradually ages, weakens and finally dies. Destruction is apparent everywhere, and therefore Bhairavi is present everywhere. She is also called Shubmkari, Good Mother to Good People and Terrible to bad ones. Its believed that when Bhairavi entered the battle field, her horrible appearance made the demons become weak and very feeble, and it's believed that most of the demons started panicking as soon as they saw her. Bhairavi is seen mainly as the Mahakali in the Durga Saptashathi version of slaying Shumbha and Nishumbha. However, she kills and drinks the blood of Chanda and Munda the Chieftains of asuras, so the Goddess Parvathi gives her a boon that she would be called Chamundeshwari. In other forms she is also identified with Parvathi or Durga. When furious she is found sitting on a faithful donkey, with her mouth full of demons' blood, her body covered with a tiger skin and skeleton. She also presents the abhaya mudra and vara mudhra, and she is shown holding weapons such as a trident, axe, and thunderbolt.

One of her dhyana mantras, that of Sampatprada-bhairavi, says that she is intoxicated with her youth, and most descriptions of her, despite her association with destruction, say that she is attractive, young, and shapely.

Bhairavi has facets and epithets that assert her cosmic importance, if not supremacy. A commentary on the Parashurama-kalpasutra says that the name Bhairavi is derived from the words bharana (to create), ramana (to protect), and vamana (to emit or disgorge). The commentator, that is, seeks to discern the inner meaning of Bhairavi’s name by identifying her with the cosmic functions of creation, maintenance, and destruction.

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